Browse By Topic: Home modification

Find helpful products and learn to make adaptations and changes in your home that can help you to remain independent, safe, and more "in control" when you're preparing meals, cleaning, or taking care of personal care tasks. Learn to survey your home and make essential modifications, such as lighting and glare and color and contrast, that you can use to make room-by-room changes throughout your home and maintain control of your personal living environment. You can also register with VisionAware to receive email alerts about new blog posts in this – and other – topic areas.

Dishwasher Users Beware: Check Twice Before Putting Soap in Your Machine

Editor's note: This is part of our ongoing series, Laughter Is Often the Best Medicine. The contributors to this series hope their vignettes provide a chuckle, an aha moment, or dispel myths about visual impairment for all readers. Am I in the Middle of a Soap Opera? I have used a dishwasher for many years. I can load and set up the machine in my sleep. I simply rinse off my dishes and silverware, placing them in the various compartments.


Five Reasons Why I Still Use a Landline Phone

Today, with the ever-increasing advancements in technology, many people are cutting the cord and getting rid of their landline phone. They are using their cell or smartphone to make those necessary phone calls. Their smartphone can accomplish that and so much more, so some might think, why continue to have a landline? Well, I can give you at least five reasons why I still continue to use mine. Even though I am in my mid-40s, I am a bit old fashioned and thoroughly enjoy my landline phone, and here are the reasons why. Five Reasons Why I Use a Landline Phone I can get to my landline quickly and


Making Square Foot Gardening More Accessible with the Seeding Square

In a recent VisionAware article, I described how transitioning my vegetable garden from flat row to raised beds has made me a more productive "Out of Sight Gardener." To summarize, a raised bed garden is a plot framed with wood or blocks or some other material formed into raised growing spaces no wider than four feet and as long and as high as you have the desire, space, and garden soil to accommodate. There are


Maintaining Independent Living with a Visual Impairment

Editor's Note: Today's post is from guest blogger, Jackie Waters. Jackie is a mother of four boys and lives on a farm in Oregon. She is passionate about providing a healthy and happy home for her family and aims to provide advice for others on how to do the same through her own website. She has recently had an older relative come live with her and, together, they worked on needed changes in the home to make it safe and easy to access. We are sharing this for Older Americans Month to help caregivers and their loved ones who are encountering similar situations. A Stranger in Your Own Home If you’re dealing with some sort of visual impairmentwhether it be from injury,


Senior Center Without Walls: Opportunities for Connection and Community from Your Home

As you go through the holidays and start thinking about the new year, I am sure that, like everyone else, you are considering what's ahead for you. Based on my own experiences this past year, I highly recommend that you consider involvement in the Senior Center Without Walls, as a volunteer and/or participant. Find out why! What is Senior Center Without Walls? Senior Center Without Walls (SCWW) is an innovative outreach program for seniors which offers activities, education, friendly conversation, and an assortment of classes, support groups, and presentations all done over the phone or computer. Each week, seniors can access over 70 groups or classes by phone or


Television on the Internet

Editor's note: The information in this post has been updated in this article, Television on the Internet. For additional information on watching TV, check out Enjoying Television with Vision Loss. TV on the Net by Steve Kelley, CVRT Cut the cord! Television viewing has


A New Home? Choosing a Retirement Living Community When You Have Vision Loss

Packing up the home where you have lived for years, leaving the familiar neighborhood and moving some place new is stressful enough for any senior. When vision loss is part of the picture, it can add another layer of anxiety. Are you wondering: How will I find my way around a large new building? How will I make friends when I can’t recognize anyone’s face? How will I get out to do my errands when I don’t drive and don’t have my friends nearby to help out? Choosing Your New Home When you are choosing your new home, be proactive. Ask questions. Explore the facility including the living area and the common areas. This is


Fall Prevention Is Not Just for Seniors

When I search for articles, seminars, webinars or conferences on fall prevention they always seem to be geared toward seniors. They focus on those in the age group of 50 and up. But falls can happen to anyone at any age. I know this is true because I have had a couple of falls in the last few years and I am in my forties. As a result, I have become much more aware of the way I live my life so that I can prevent more falls in my future. For example, I don’t talk on my cell phone while walking with my white cane. Talking on the phone while trying to navigate and use proper mobility can cause major distractions and possibly a nasty fall. Ten Tips and Suggestions To Prevent Falls <img src="http://www.afb.org/image.asp?ImageID=7774" alt="woman


Determining the Livability of Communities for People with Vision Loss

Editor's note: Finding a livable community for people who are visually impaired can be very challenging. In 2003, the American Foundation for the Blind did a study to determine the key criteria for livable communities for people who are blind or visually impaired. VisionAware recently followed up on this study to determine if the criteria identified years ago was still viable and if the cities named in the study still made the list. Although not just for seniors, we are bringing you this post just in time for Healthy Aging Month. Developing Criteria on the


Finding a New Home: Bucket List Sequel Four, Part 2

Sue Martin--Unexpected Surprises This wasn’t on my bucket list, at least for this year, but…we’ve found our home in Maine. It’s under contract with a closing date in October. Our house in Alabama is on the market with strong interest. The house in Maine is a geodesic dome on 18 acres and it’s on a lake. It has a windmill and solar panels and we’ll be able to be off the grid. The property contains mixed woodland with open ground that’s a combination of grass and blueberries. It has a huge greenhouse and raised beds for growing vegetables. The Biggest News Here’s the biggest news. A member of he Senior Executive Service at Veterans


Wardrobe Combos: Time-Saving Tips for People Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

Getting the Jump on the Morning Routine You’re probably aware of the saying: "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." I can think of many areas in life where this saying could be applicable, but none more than the daily morning routine. You know the one where you’ve just overslept and you jump up in automatic panic mode wondering how in the world you’re going to be able to get yourself together in time to get to work. This issue is irritating to just about anyone but if you are blind or visually impaired it’s especially annoying. If the above scenario has happened to you, take heart and know that you are not


Protect Your Independence: Create a Fall Prevention Plan

Editor's note: September is National Fall Prevention Month. The VisionAware peer advisors felt it important to bring to our readers the risk factors as well as what you can do to prevent falls. VisionAware has many resources to help you and many of these are included in this post. Being Pro-Active My vision loss has caused me to fall many times in the past. As I get older this concerns me because I realize the potential for serious injuries. So I decided to attend a workshop on Fall Prevention. I would like to share the highlights of what I learned since this is National Fall Prevention Month. Falls Are Not a "Normal" Part of the Aging Process Many


How to Make Your "Home Sweet Home" Safe

Home Safety Month There is nothing so comforting as our "home sweet home" to return to after being away for a few hours, a day or a vacation. But often, it is our homes that can pose the greatest risks to our safety especially if you are blind or visually impaired. At home, we take off our emotional armor to relax, our dog guides are off duty. Our sighted family can even forget we can’t see and are in relax mode too. Distractions abound and before you know it, a dining chair was left out from the table, a cupboard door left ajar and a glass of water was perched right where you could knock it from the bench to smash on the floor. Accidents do happen – but why not eliminate


Being Organized is a Matter of Survival for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Organization is a Matter of Survival During September, as Healthy Vision and Aging month and Falls Prevention Day, may we continue to value the importance of considering the organizational needs of others in our lives. I'm sure that the older we get, the more we will value our filing systems! Familiarity Breeds Contentment "It's incredible what you can do if you just learn to do it in a different way. It's all about always knowing


A Day in the Life of a Vision Rehabilitation Therapist For People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

What I Do for a Living Editor's note: This week we are celebrating Vision Rehabilitation Therapist week. Join us in celebrating this honored and valued profession I am a vision rehabilitation therapist (VRT) and often I am asked exactly what I do for a living. The question is not as easy to answer as it may first appear. The answer, like the profession itself, has as many answers as there are VRTs. This profession draws people from a variety of cultures, ages, ethnicities and beliefs. Some have little personal experience with


Giving Up Your Car Keys When You Have Vision Loss and How That Affects Where You Live

by DeAnna Quietwater Noriega Fair Housing Month April is Fair Housing Month. And I thought this might be a good time to consider vision loss and housing choices. Considering Where To Live When You are Visually Impaired One of the things that a person with vision loss has to consider is where to live. When you reach the point that driving is no longer an option, getting where you need to go


Getting Started: Responding Proactively To the Challenge Of Losing Your Vision

Challenges Everyone has been presented with many challenges throughout their lifetime. Some more than others, but we all have challenges. When presented with any type of challenge it is natural that our behaviors change initially. For example, often when we hear any discouraging news, our knee jerk behavior is to react. We ask "Why me?" or "What did I do to deserve this?" That is a "reaction" and it is normal, but reactions are not productive. Another behavior is to "respond," to ask thoughtful questions, to be proactive in finding solutions. When we respond, we are taking a positive step towards rising to the challenge


Vision Loss and Solving Problems, Part Two

Editor's note: Vision Rehabilitation Therapist and new Peer Advisor Linda Fugate, EdD, brings a practical approach to finding solutions for living with vision loss. Read Part One. Part Two focuses on three examples of applying the ADAPT method for problem solving. Solving the ChallengesApplying the ADAPT Method Attitude Example: Mary has macular degeneration. She is concerned that she can no longer find anything; nothing is where it belongs. She does not want to mark items; she does not want


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