Browse By Topic: Getting Around

New Research: Using Virtual Reality Environments to Help with Wayfinding Problems Related to Glaucoma

Glaucoma often is called "the sneak thief of sight" for good reason: Many people are unaware that glaucoma has few symptoms or warning signs in its early stages. Early treatment for glaucoma can sometimes (but not always) slow the progression of the disease. However, as of yet, there is no cure for glaucoma and its resulting visual field loss, which can interfere with a wide range of everyday activities. Visual field loss from glaucoma can create problems with moving safely


Protect Amtrak: An Important Part of Our Transportation Infrastructure

Editor's Note: In our Independence Day post, we discussed the 21st Century Agenda on Aging and Vision Loss and the first goal of increasing funding for services to maximize independence for older persons with vision loss. In today's post, we cover one of the initiatives of goal three of the Agenda, the need for good and available transportation for all phases of life as noted in this quote from


Researchers Continue to Explore the Potential of Human Echolocation and Acoustics for People with Vision Loss

Logo of the AcousticalSociety of America Vision rehabilitation professionals, including Orientation and Mobility Specialists, Vision Rehabilitation Therapists, and Low Vision Therapists, have long been aware of the need to incorporate sensory input, including echolocation, in their instructional programs. Human echolocation describes the ability of humans to detect objects in their environments by sensing reflected sound waves from those objects. Now it appears that acoustic scientists are also


Aira: A New and Exciting Access Service for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Aira (pronounced "EYE-rah") has made quite a debut on the access technology scene recently. It has impressed the likes of CSUN2017, Assistive Media, Inc., and won "Best in Show" honors at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. I learned about Aira at this year’s American Foundation for the Blind Leadership Conference, and it wowed me too!   What Is Aira? Aira calls itself a "visual


H.R.2050: The Medicare Demonstration of Coverage of Low Vision Devices Act of 2017 Needs Your Advocacy and Support

Dome of the U.S. Capitol The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) Public Policy Center has announced the reintroduction of federal legislation that seeks to establish a nationwide Medicare demonstration project to evaluate the fiscal impact of a permanent change in Medicare coverage that would, for the first time, provide reimbursement for low vision devices. The AFB Public Policy Center, in Washington, DC, collaborates with policy


New Research: Automobile Side Windows Do not Offer Sufficient Protection from UV Light, Increase the Risk of Cataracts and Other Eye Diseases

United States government regulations require automobile windshields to be made with laminated glass to lessen potential injury when shattered. The combination of laminated glass and extra-thick glass in front windshields provides protection against ultraviolet-A radiation. However, new research from California indicates that automobile side windows do not provide the same level of protection against ultraviolet-A radiation compared to the front-facing windshield, which may increase the risk of cataracts and skin cancer for frequent drivers. In addition, there is


Meet Dr. Gislin Dagnelie and Dr. Duane Geruschat: Pioneers in the Study of Restored and Prosthetic Vision

Gislin Dagnelie, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the associate director of the Lions Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center, a division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute. His work over the last 20 years has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation,


New Research Explained: Restoring Vision Following Long-Term Blindness: Prosthetic Vision and Considerations for Rehabilitation

During the past several years, there has been much "buzz" in the popular press about the capabilities of the so-called "bionic" eye, described variously as "miraculous," "restoring sight," and "letting me see again." At VisionAware, we have followed the development of "bionic" or "prosthetic" vision closely, avoiding hyperbole and striving to report factual, research-based information about the limitations of restored vision. Now, in this month's edition of the Journal of Vision Impairment & Blindness, two researchers who are pioneers in the study of prosthetic vision analyze the current state of the art in


AFB Press Releases New Edition of Making Life More Livable: Simple Adaptations for Living at Home after Vision Loss

by Mary D'Apice, VisionAware Contributing Writer An interview with Maureen A. Duffy, CVRT, Author Making Life More Livable Agencies that provide services to people who are blind or visually impaired offer vision rehabilitation to the 5.3 million Americans over 65 with


Exercising Safely With Diabetes: Part 4 in a Series

Audrey Demmitt, RN, BSN, is a nurse diabetic educator, VisionAware Peer Advisor, AFB Career Connect mentor, and author of the VisionAware multi-part blog series on diabetes and diabetes education. At age 25, Audrey was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa and continued to work as a nurse for 30 years with her visual impairment. She has worked as an Adjustment to Blindness


Meet Dan Roberts, Developer of the "LowViz Guide" Indoor Wayfinding Application

Dan Roberts, M.M.E., is the Founding Director of MD Support, Inc. and the International Low Vision Support Group. He is the editor-in-chief of Living Well with Low Vision, an extensive online resource center affiliated with Prevent Blindness. In addition to heading MD Support and the International Low Vision Support Group, Dan is a resource consultant for the Macular


New Research: "Blindness Simulation" Activities May Do More Harm than Good

New research findings from the University of Colorado indicate that blindness simulations – intended to be bridge-builders resulting in greater compassion and understanding – can sometimes harm rather than help. According to the authors, simulation activities, and blindness simulations in particular, "highlight the initial challenges of becoming disabled" and thus "decrease the perceived adaptability of being disabled and reduce the judged capabilities of disabled people." The lead author is Arielle Silverman, now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle, who is blind and has experienced a variety of reactions from the public, related to people's


New Research: Which Factors Influence Persons with Low Vision to Pursue Rehabilitation Services?

When is the best time for a person to pursue low vision rehabilitation services? What are the factors that influence a person to make a "positive personal choice" to seek out low vision rehabilitation? A multi-disciplinary group of Canadian researchers has attempted to answer these questions, via a study that (a) categorizes the "predictors of awareness" of low vision rehabilitation services and (b) examines the critical factors that influence an individual's decision to access vision rehabilitation services. They conclude that, even


Guest Blogger Jeremiah Taylor Reviews Descriptive Audio Narration for "Unbroken"

Guest blogger Jeremiah Taylor is a dynamic sales professional, motivational speaker, and serious movie buff. Life has not always been easy for Jeremiah, however. In 1999, he became suddenly and totally blind as a result of complications during routine back surgery. You can read more about Jeremiah's (and his wife Jo-Ann's) long, steady journey – from sudden blindness through rehabilitation to full employment – at the VisionAware website. "Going to the movies," Jeremiah says, "is not just the movie! It's a night out with friends and family,


Could Echolocation Become a "Complete Sensory Replacement" for Sight? New Research Says Yes

New research from the United Kingdom and Canada has examined the influence of echolocation (explained below), a method that many blind persons use to perceive the location and structure of objects in the environment. The researchers determined, via controlled experimentation, that "echolocation is not just a functional tool to help visually impaired individuals navigate their environment; rather, it has the potential to be an actual sensory replacement for vision." Psychological Science The research, entitled The Size-Weight Illusion


Do You Have Problems with Light and Glare Sensitivity? Meet Leann Gibson, Who Has Been There Too!

Leann Gibson was born and raised in the small community of Wainwright, Alberta, Canada. Leann and her husband Steve are professional chefs who "fell in love over a buffet line," as they like to say. Steve also serves in the Canadian military; thus, says Leann, "Moving is a way of life, so our home is truly where the heart is." Leann's vision loss journey began in June 2012, when she awoke one morning with a sense that something was "not right" and had seemingly changed overnight. Coincidentally, she was working in an optometrist's office as an optometric assistant at the time. At work later that morning, Leann was overwhelmed by a cascade of visual changes,


A Progress Update: the OrCam Wearable Visual System

During the past several months, I have received a number of inquiries from readers about the status of the OrCam: A Portable, Wearable Visual System for Blind and Visually Impaired Persons. When the OrCam was initially released in 2013, the parent company indicated that the OrCam would begin shipping 100 units in the fall of 2013, with further production unfolding in late 2013 and early 2014. That projected schedule has been delayed, however, and readers have begun to question both the company and the product; thus, I took


Celebrating White Cane Safety Day and Blind Americans Equality Day: October 15, 2014

White Cane Safety Day is an international observance that is celebrated on October 15 of each year since 1964. Its purpose is to (a) celebrate the achievements of people who are blind or visually impaired and (b) acknowledge and pay tribute to the long white cane, a critically important mobility tool and potent symbol of independence. In 2011, White Cane Safety Day was also declared


Meet Lorraine Keller, Ph.D. and My Mobile Light™ Low Vision Aid at Technical Vision, Inc.

Lorraine Keller, Ph.D. is the CEO of Technical Vision, Inc., a medical equipment company specializing in the design and manufacture of quality personal assistive devices. Technical Vision's customers, many of whom are older adults, live every day with chronic, uncorrectable eye conditions. These conditions include macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinal disease,


Meet Robert Wall Emerson, Ph.D. and the Newly-Funded "Better Long White Cane" Project

Robert Wall Emerson, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Blindness and Low Vision Studies at Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo. Dr. Wall Emerson, in conjunction with WMU colleagues Dae Shik Kim, Ph.D. (the principal investigator) and Koorosh Naghshineh, Ph.D., is the recent recipient of a $421,125 grant award from the National Institutes of Health/National Eye Institute. The three-year grant, entitled


The Imago Maris Foundation: Sailing the Seas with an Integrated Blind and Sighted Crew

The Imago Maris Foundation, headquartered in Warsaw, Poland, recently launched an international program to promote sailing on the high seas, integrate crews of blind, visually impaired, and sighted sailors, and provide meaningful sailing and travel experiences. About the Imago Maris Foundation The primary goal of the Imago Maris Foundation is to promote the rehabilitation and integration of men and women who are blind or visually impaired through active participation in sea voyages; in addition, the Foundation seeks to demystify blindness by utilizing fully integrated (50% blind, 50% sighted) crews. Every person, regardless of visual status, performs all tasks related to the operation of the ship. According to


What Is Visual Ability? A New Study Looks at Low Vision Rehabilitation

Researchers associated with the Low Vision Research Network Study Group have identified a number of non-visual factors that can affect "visual ability" [i.e., a person's ability to perform everyday tasks that are dependent on vision] in a group of older adults participating in outpatient low vision rehabilitation. The study concludes that visual ability is an individualized "multidimensional construct" that includes a number of interrelated visual and non-visual factors, such as visual acuity, mobility, physical ability, depression measures, and cognition (thinking, understanding, learning, and remembering). In addition, the researchers note that the


New Research: An Innovative Simulator Evaluates Eye Diseases and Driving Performance

The University of California, San Diego School of Medicine is the first ophthalmology department in the country to feature a fully dedicated, high-fidelity, realistic driving simulator to evaluate the effects of visual impairment, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, on an individual's driving performance. The UC San Diego driving simulatorSource: UC San Diego Health System Newsroom Located in the Visual Performance Laboratory of the


Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Is It Cognition or Is It Vision Loss? by Guest Blogger DeAnn Elliott

DeAnn Elliott is a blogger for The Carroll Center for the Blind in Newton, Massachusetts, where she graduated in 2007 after losing her eyesight to retinitis pigmentosa. Via her posts to The Carroll Center blog and other sites, DeAnn explores the adventures and challenges of vision loss as it relates to family life, employment, rehabilitation training, disability advocacy, and sometimes dogs. Learn more about DeAnn at The


Guest Blogger Jeremiah Taylor: A Tribute to Wojtek Jacobi, My Orientation and Mobility Instructor

Guest blogger Jeremiah Taylor (pictured at left) is the founder and CEO of ProActive Sales, Inc., a full-service sales management company. In 1999, Jeremiah became suddenly and totally blind as a result of complications during routine back surgery. You can read more about Jeremiah's (and his wife Jo-Ann's) long, steady, and inspirational journey – from sudden blindness through rehabilitation to full employment – at the VisionAware website. In addition to his talents as a dynamic sales professional and motivational speaker,


Our Readers Want to Know: How Can I Travel Safely Outdoors if I'm Blind or have Low Vision?

Editor's note: One of the many benefits associated with an online information center and website, such as VisionAware, is the ability to track readers' search terms [i.e., information readers are seeking as they search the Internet]. The following questions about outdoor travel with low vision or blindness consistently rank within VisionAware's top twenty information searches: What is orientation and mobility? How can I travel outside if I can't see? Is it safe to walk outside with just a white cane? An Answer from Dona Sauerburger, COMS <img src="/image.asp?ImageID=3521" style="margin:0 10px 10px 0;"


New Research: Do Adults with Macular Degeneration and Glaucoma Stay Closer to Home?

Researchers from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging have presented evidence that older Americans with age-related macular degeneration tend not to travel as far from home as older adults with unimpaired vision. This was not the case, however, among the study subjects with glaucoma, even though both conditions cause vision loss which generally makes travel more difficult. The research, entitled Alteration of Travel Patterns with Vision Loss from Glaucoma and Macular


An Interview with Dr. Yonatan Wexler, Head of Research and Development at OrCam

VisionAware is pleased to speak with Dr. Yonatan Wexler, the head of Research and Development at OrCam, an Israeli start-up company founded in 2010 by Amnon Shashua, Sachs Professor of Computer Science at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The mission of OrCam is to develop a "portable, wearable visual system with 'human-like' capabilities" for blind and visually impaired persons, via the use of artificial computer intelligence and augmented reality. The OrCam is based on a computer algorithm that Professor Shashua has pioneered with Dr. Wexler and


What Is Optic Flow? Why Is It Important for People with Low Vision?

New research from Indiana University is investigating how "optic flow," or setting objects and scenes in motion, can help people who have low vision to interpret and comprehend the blurred images they typically encounter in everyday life. According to the researchers, the concept of optic flow "has important implications for understanding the daily functioning of [persons] with low vision." The research, entitled With an Eye to Low Vision: Optic Flow Enables


Gil Johnson, His Guide Dog Harley, and The Seeing Eye: Learning to Be an Even Better Team

Gil Johnson is a talented woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Woodworking, Gil's Guide to Home Repairs and Parenting or Grandparenting with Vision Loss on the VisionAware website. Earlier this year, Gil kept a diary during his time at


Where I've Been: My Blindness Work in Central Europe

Last month, I took a break from my duties at VisionAware.org to visit Central Europe, teach in the post-graduate Low Vision Therapy program at the Akademia Pedagogiki Specjalnej im. Marii Grzegorzewskiej (the Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education) in Warsaw, and attend a Board of Directors meeting for the Kielce-based VEGA Foundation, directed by my longtime friend and colleague Agnieszka (Agnes) Janicka-Maj.


A New Independent Living Series from Hadley School for the Blind

As our readers know, I have great admiration for the ongoing – and important – educational commitment of The Hadley School for the Blind. The mission of Hadley is to promote independent living through lifelong distance education programs for people who are blind or visually impaired, their families, and blindness service providers. A New "Mini-Course" Independent Living Series from Hadley Hadley's new Independent Living series takes a mini-course approach, allowing students to focus on a specific aspect of independent living, based on individual needs and interests. The


Ford Motor Company and University of Cambridge: Research on Driving and Age-Related Vision Changes

The Ford Motor Company is teaming with the University of Cambridge Engineering Design Center to create automobile controls and displays that are responsive to the needs of the growing numbers of adults with age-related vision changes. Age-Related Vision Changes Just as the body undergoes age-related changes, our eyes undergo similar age-related changes as well. Many of these vision and eye changes are normal and are not caused by disease or illness. They can, however, make it difficult to perform many everyday activities, such as reading small print and seeing


Echolocation: A Case Study by Guest Blogger Marta Fonmudeh, Vision Australia

Guest blogger Marta Fonmudeh, M.Ed, is an Orientation and Mobility (O&M) Specialist and Senior Practitioner with Vision Australia. As Senior Practitioner, Marta oversees the professional development and clinical supervision of all O&M staff within Vision Australia. Marta is also a VisionAware Peer Advisor. Last week on the VisionAware blog, we examined the process of echolocation, or Using Your Ears


Echolocation: Using Your Ears to Help You "See"

You can view Rowan's video at YouTube. Rowan, an 18-month-old German Spitz dog, was born without eyes, a rare condition known as anophthalmia. His owner Samantha Orchard, a dog breeder in the United Kingdom, was "stunned" when she realized that Rowan was using echolocation to navigate his environment – by barking and then listening to the echoes created by his bark to determine his location in relation to his surroundings. You can read more about Rowan at the


A New Study Examines Vision Impairment, Balance Problems, and Falls

A new study, published "online first" on June 6, 2013 in JAMA Ophthalmology (formerly Archives of Ophthalmology), concludes that visually impaired individuals have a significantly greater risk of balance problems. The authors also offer suggestions to develop more effective fall prevention strategies for individuals with visual impairment or reduced visual acuity. JAMA Ophthalmology is an international peer-reviewed journal published monthly by the American Medical Association (AMA), and is part of the


A Dog Guide Diary by Gil Johnson and Harley at The Seeing Eye, Inc. (Part 4)

Gil Johnson is a talented woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Home Repairs on the VisionAware website. You can learn more about Gil's early life and professional accomplishments at Meet Gil Johnson. This month, Gil is at The Seeing Eye, Inc. in Morristown, New Jersey, training with his new guide dog (pictured left). In


A Dog Guide Diary by Gil Johnson and Harley at The Seeing Eye, Inc. (Part 3)

Gil Johnson is a talented woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Home Repairs and Parenting or Grandparenting with Vision Loss on the VisionAware website. You can learn more about Gil's early life and professional accomplishments at Meet Gil Johnson. This month, Gil is at The Seeing Eye, Inc. in Morristown, New Jersey, training with his new


A Dog Guide Diary by Gil Johnson and Harley at The Seeing Eye, Inc. (Part 2)

Gil Johnson is a talented woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Home Repairs and Parenting or Grandparenting with Vision Loss on the VisionAware website. You can learn more about Gil's life and professional accomplishments in VisionAware's in-depth interview with Gil and at


A Dog Guide Diary by Gil Johnson and Harley at The Seeing Eye, Inc. (Part 1)

Gil Johnson is a talented woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Home Repairs and Parenting or Grandparenting with Vision Loss on the VisionAware website. You can learn more about Gil's life and professional accomplishments in VisionAware's in-depth interview with Gil and at


Meet Gil Johnson: Blind Woodworker and One of California's "50 Notable People"

Gil Johnson is an avid (and talented) woodworker and the author of Gil's Guide to Home Repairs and Parenting or Grandparenting with Vision Loss on the VisionAware website. Gil also hosts the Repairing Your Home message board, where you can ask him any question about home repair techniques and tips. Gil's professional life began as a Rehabilitation Counselor and


My Amazing Amazon Adventure by VisionAware Peer Advisor Michelle Miller, LCSW

Guest blogger Michelle Miller, LCSW, is a licensed psychotherapist and professional grant writer who also serves as Director of Client Services for Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind in Washington, D.C. Michelle has advocated on behalf of clients with disabilities as an expert witness for legal matters and serves as a consultant to "vision awareness" events and documentaries. She is a board member with Guide Dogs for the Blind and the New Hope Development Corporation, a non-profit organization for underserved children and families she


New Research on Driving Patterns in Older Adults with Glaucoma

A new study, entitled Driving patterns in older adults with glaucoma, has been published online on February 21, 2013, in BMC Ophthalmology. The study concludes that glaucoma and visual field loss from glaucoma are associated with a greater likelihood that older adults will limit driving, stop driving, or change their driving preferences. The authors are Suzanne W. van Landingham, Chad Hochberg, Robert W.


In Memoriam: Professor Whitestick

I have always been an avid follower of blind bloggers – and of arts bloggers who are blind, in particular. My favorite has always been Professor Whitestick, whom I featured in a VisionAware Blogroll Love post last year: Professor Whitestick's Blog Professor Whitestick is the voice (and considerable intellect) that informs the deeply felt cultural and artistic observations on Professor Whitestick's Blog. The Professor describes himself and his reasons for


Scene from a Barbershop: Deaf-Blindness Considered

I was preparing to leave my favorite venerable Greenwich Village barbershop this past week (after my monthly "bob-maintenance" appointment), when a murmur rippled through the premises: "You have to see this guy! Don't leave yet – watch what he does." I looked up, and sure enough – a youngish blind man paused at the front door, getting his bearings and orienting himself, so it seemed. He carried a long white cane and I could see that he also wore two hearing aids. He was deaf-blind.


How Visible Are Steps and Stairs for People with Low Vision?

As many readers know, I am a vision rehabilitation therapist (VRT) and a low vision therapist (LVT) with a lifelong professional interest in assessing and modifying indoor and outdoor environments for people who are blind or have low vision. One of my particular interests is steps and stairs: How easy – or difficult – are they to see, decipher [i.e., step up or step down], and navigate safely? Thus, I have been


Fear of Falling, Eye Disease, and Limitations in Daily Activities: They're All Related

Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, the official journal of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), has published yet another thought-provoking study about the real-life ramifications of adult-onset vision loss. The Association for Research in Vision & Ophthalmology Activity Limitation Due To a Fear of Falling in Older Adults with Eye Disease was published in the December 3, 2012 online edition of


New Research on Glaucoma, Impaired Eye Movements, and Daily Living Activities

A new study, published in the November 27, 2012 issue of the online journal Eye and Brain, concludes that saccadic eye movements are significantly delayed in individuals with early, moderate, or advanced glaucoma. Eye and Brain is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on clinical and experimental research in the field of neuro-ophthalmology. About Saccades and Eye Movements Saccades (pronounced suh-KAHDZ) are


Losing Patience with Being a Patient by Stephanie Stephens Van

Guest blogger Stephanie Stephens Van has lectured nationally on adapted crafts and leisure activities; adjustment to blindness and low vision; functional vision skills; and activities of daily living. Stephanie is a Vision Rehabilitation Therapist, a Low Vision Therapist, and an adjunct instructor at the Salus University College of Education and Rehabilitation.


Emergency Preparedness with Blindness and Visual Impairment: A First-Person Account

Guest blogger Lisa Salinger (at left) works for Serotek in the Sales and Customer Service departments. She is a regular contributor on the SeroTalk Podcast Network and provides training in the use of Serotek's screen reader and related products. Prior to this, she worked as a Vision Rehabilitation Therapist/Rehabilitation Teacher for the state of Pennsylvania. You can visit her website, Lisa's Creative Solutions, and


Meet Scott Anderson and the New England Blind and Visually Impaired Alpine Ski Festival

Scott Anderson is a friend of VisionAware, an avid (and skilled) blind skier, and is deeply involved in planning the second New England Blind and Visually Impaired Alpine Ski Festival, to be held February 10-14, 2013 at Sugarloaf Mountain Resort in Carrabassett Valley, Maine. Scott (at left in photo with guide Fran Mullin) is a legally blind alpine, or downhill, skier who is active with Maine Adaptive Sports and Recreation, a non-profit organization and sponsor of the annual Festival. How It All Began Here's more from Scott


Adventures In Sighted/Blind Air Travel

In a few days, I'll be departing for Poland to work with the VEGA Foundation and teach/lecture at The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education in Warsaw. I've been traveling there since 1995, and have made many close friends throughout the years. Whenever I visit Poland, I always bring along a rigid (meaning non-folding and non-collapsible) carbon fiber cane from the National Federation of the Blind for my good friend


Can a Guide Dog "Know" Its Owner Is Blind?

Last week, while perusing my usual (i.e., prodigious) range of blindness- and vision-related news, blogs, and links, I discovered a fascinating post on the Psychology Today blog, entitled Professor, Does My Dog Know I'm Blind: Can we know what animals know about what we know? Dr. Herzog and the Human-Animal Dynamic It was authored by Hal Herzog, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at Western Carolina University, whose academic research explores the psychology


Finding and Hiring a Driver If You're Blind or Visually Impaired by Stephanie Stephens Van

Guest blogger Stephanie Stephens Van has lectured nationally on adapted crafts and leisure activities; adjustment to blindness and low vision; functional vision skills; and activities of daily living. Stephanie is a Vision Rehabilitation Therapist, a Low Vision Therapist, and an adjunct instructor at the Salus University College of Education and


New Research on Hip Fractures and Cataract Surgery

A new study, published in the August 1, 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, indicates that the risk of hip fractures was significantly reduced in patients aged 65 and older who had undergone cataract surgery, compared with those patients who did not undergo cataract surgery. The Study Authors The study, entitled Risk of Fractures


Ford Motor Company and University of Cambridge are Helping Drivers with Age-Related Vision Changes

The Ford Motor Company is teaming with the University of Cambridge Engineering Design Center to create automobile controls and displays that are responsive to the needs of the growing numbers of adults with age-related vision changes. What are age-related vision changes? Just as the body changes with age, our eyes undergo changes too. Many of these vision and eye changes are normal and are not caused by disease or illness. They can, however, make it difficult to


New Research About Drivers and Blind and Visually Impaired Pedestrians

The Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) is the premier international, interdisciplinary journal of record on blindness and visual impairment. JVIB publishes scholarship and information and serves as a forum for exchanging ideas, airing controversies, and discussing critical professional issues. (Note: As a long-time JVIB subscriber, my personal library contains almost every print issue dating from 1981. That's 30 years of superb reference material! And yes, I am a research


A Dialogue at Lunch with the Blind Food Critic and another Dialogue about Dialogue in the Dark

Many good things have happened in Daniel Aronoff's professional life recently, so I wanted to catch up with him again (and participate in yet another of his semi-decadent restaurant reviews, thinly disguised as a follow-up VisionAware Personal Story). Daniel is New York City's premier (and only, methinks) blind food critic. You can read about his always-interesting culinary experiences at


The Low Vision Design Committee of the National Institute of Building Sciences Needs You

The National Institute of Building Sciences is in the process of forming a multidisciplinary open committee to explore how design of the built environment can affect the needs of the millions of people with low vision in the United States. The Low Vision Design Committee The Low Vision


Doctor, Can I Still Drive? Part 2 of a Conversation with Richard Hom, OD, MPA

Guest blogger Dr. Richard Hom has served as a low vision specialist for the Permanente Medical Group's Golden Gate Service Area of three hospitals. Dr. Hom holds a Doctor of Optometry degree from the University of California and a Master's degree in Public Administration from San Francisco State University. You can follow Dr. Hom on Twitter @GrandRounds4ODs. Previously, Dr. Hom


Doctor, Can I Still Drive? A Conversation with Richard Hom, OD, MPA

Guest blogger Dr. Richard Hom has served as a low vision specialist for the Permanente Medical Group's Golden Gate Service Area of three hospitals. Dr. Hom holds a Doctor of Optometry degree from the University of California and a Master's degree in Public Administration from San Francisco State University. You can follow Dr. Hom on Twitter @GrandRounds4ODs. "Doctor, can I still drive?" "Will my license be taken away?" "How can I


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