Recreation and Leisure for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

There are many recreation and leisure activities that can be adapted for people who are blind or have low vision, or for seniors who are losing their sight. You may want to return to an activity you've always enjoyed, or you may want to try something new, challenging, and altogether different, such as Scrabble, running, or tandem biking!

There is a wide range of recreational, social, and craft activities for you to consider, including crafting, card and board games, cultural activities, gardening, swimming, skiing, bowling, rowing, hiking, running, bowling, and tandem biking.

Peer Advisor Trina Bassak, DPT: Sedentary Lifestyles and Their Impact on Health

Trina Bassak, DPT, working with a patient

Trina Bassak, Doctor
of Physical Therapy

The Impact of Increasingly Sedentary Lifestyles

You may have heard the phrase "sitting is the new smoking," but what does this mean, exactly? How does it affect you and what can you do about it?

Researchers have been studying our increasingly sedentary lifestyles for years to determine the impact on our health and mortality. With advancements in technology, people are sitting more and moving less. From sitting during our daily commute, sitting in the office or on our computers, sitting to watch television …you get the picture. The World Health Organization has determined physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for death for people around the world.

Ways to Decrease Your Sitting Time

Simple strategies to begin decreasing sitting time include getting up to stand or walk during TV commercials; standing while making a phone call; and getting up every half hour while on your computer. It doesn't seem like a lot, but remember that every few minutes of added standing, decreases your total sitting time.

Research has also shown that 10 minutes of activity worked into your day will provide health benefits. Increments of 10 minutes seem much more manageable and you will notice an increase in concentration, lifted mood, decreased stress and improved energy, in addition to the physical benefits. Depending on the type of activity, you may also have increased flexibility, strength, balance, and endurance.

Read more from Trina at Physical Fitness: Move More, Sit Less at the Visually Impaired: Now What? blog.

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