Browse By Topic: Employment

My Experience Using the LinkedIn Website and App

I have had a profile on LinkedIn for a couple of years now, and I am fairly familiar with the website. I will post news I want to share or will say congrats on a connection's work anniversary from time to time. Sometimes I will even post a comment on one of my groups when an interesting link to an article is posted. But admittedly, I have not been using LinkedIn to its fullest capacity. The reason is that there have been some updates to the website that are making it more challenging to use with my screen reader. This has discouraged me from using it as much as I should. Like most social media platforms, LinkedIn has frequent updates so by the time I learn a workaround for something new, my strategy or technique no longer works. Because LinkedIn


Dealing with Workplace Bullying When You Are Visually Impaired

Editor's note: It's National Disability Employment Month. Neva Fairchild, AFB's National Employment and Independent Living Specialist, and Empish Thomas, VisionAware Peer Advisor and Career Connect Mentor have teamed up on a post on bullying in the workplace. by Empish J. Thomas When I hear the word "bullying" I tend to envision a big size kid physically and verbally harassing a smaller size kid on the playground at school. Although this vision of bullying is not incorrect it is not the only kind of bullying that occurs. Bullying can also occur on the Internet via social media like Facebook. Additionally, I am coming to understand that bullying does not only happen to


Is There Pride in Being Blind or Visually Impaired?

Editor's note: As we approach Labor Day, a day that is a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country, it is important to remember, that people who are blind or visually impaired need and want employment. This post brings up important issues to consider about blindness as a disability that impact every aspect of life, including employment. A Response on Becoming Disabled On August 19, I read a very interesting article


Nurses with Disabilities Have Great Abilities, Part Two

Imagine after years of preparing to enter the workforce and finally landing your dream job, you begin to lose your vision. You feel defeated and everyone around you thinks you won’t be able to find gainful employment or continue to work. Despite the critics and those who doubt your ability, you must always remember that you are capable. Detra Bannister took those words to heart yesterday in her story, “Nurses with Disabilities Have Great Abilities, Part One” on the CareerConnect Blog. Read how Detra overcame her vision loss and championed her skills into a successful career in today’s story. Nurses with Disabilities Have Great


The Scent of Small Business Success for Owners Who Are Visually Impaired

Home Business Built on Personal Passion Barry and Debra Carver are among a growing number of people who have joined the ranks of the self-employed. Together they own and operate their own home business, called MountainCrafted.com, a web store where they sell candles, shampoos, and other natural fragrance products they make themselves in their Smoky Mountain, Tennessee home. Barry and Debra are both blind, he from an accident and she from


The Challenges of Applying for a Job Online

Editor's note: As we end the observance of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the peer advisors decided that another critical topic to address is how applying for a job has drastically changed and what they means to individuals who are blind or visually impaired. Online Job Applications Are the New Norm As a visually impaired job seeker you will notice that more and more these day’s employers are offering and sometimes requiring that you apply for positions online. Nearly gone are the days of paper applications or


Taking Your Disability to Work, Part 2: Peer Advisors Offer Advice

Author's note: We are continuing our posts on National Disability Employment Awareness Month. This post provides advice from our Peer advisors on working with a disability. Be sure to read Part 1 of Taking Your Disability to Work. Audrey Demmitt I had been working as a school nurse for some time before I disclosed my vision impairment. It


Taking Your Disability to Work: Part 1

Author's note: Most of the peer advisors at VisionAware are working or have worked with their disability. In talking about what we should write for National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we decided that a critical topic is what employers and fellow employees need to know about employees with disabilities. This post is divided into two sections: Part 1 sets the stage about the overall issues involved and in Part 2 we will share some of the peers' thoughts and strategies. October is a time to celebrate the contributions of America's workers with disabilities. The theme for this year is "My


When Your Visual Impairment Isn't Visible

The Temptation to Pretend We Don't Have a Disability In honor of Invisible Disabilities Week, which falls from October 18 through October 24, I decided I would share a few thoughts about the temptation to pretend we don’t have a disability. What Is An Invisible Disability? According to the Invisible Disabilities Association, "the term invisible disabilities refers to symptoms such as debilitating pain, fatigue, dizziness, cognitive dysfunctions, brain injuries, learning differences and mental health disorders, as well as hearing and vision impairments. These are not always obvious to the onlooker, but can sometimes or always limit daily activities, range from mild challenges to


Erik Weihenmayer Speaks Out about National Disability Employment Awareness Month

I am the American Foundation for the Blind's CareerConnect Program Manager, which means that I manage our career exploration, job seeking skills, navigating the employment process, and e-mentoring program. AFB CareerConnect is a part of the same AFB family of websites as VisionAware. I wanted to deliver a message from a friend to VisionAware readers for National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). Attending the No Barriers Summit In July 2015, I had the opportunity to attend the No Barriers Summit, an


Top Ten Ways My Dog Guide Assists Me

Editor's note: We continue to celebrate National Service Dog Month. This post is Audrey's tribute to her dog guide Sophie and completes our series. Perfect for Each Other My guide dog Sophie is amazing. As we trained together to become a team, she wowed and captivated me with her sharp skills, attentive gaze, and beautiful face. I was certain she was the right dog for me from the very start. And I was so excited to begin my life with her. I had no idea


Volunteering with Blinded Veterans Leads to a Fulfilling Career at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Editor's note: Here is another post related to volunteering and National Volunteer Week. However, peer advisor Sue Martin, Vision Rehabilitation Therapist, also addresses another important theme this week Vision Rehabilitation Therapist Week. Volunteering at the Blind Rehabilitation Center My life with blindness began in my mid-twenties. I had to learn how to do almost everything all over again. I had great teachers and, less than a year after I became blind, my


How I Pursued a Portfolio Career

Editor's note: As we celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness month, Empish Thomas brings her perspective on today's job search for a person who is blind or visually impaired. Welcome to the Portfolio Career I have noticed that today’s job market has drastically changed. I seldom see people working many years at one company until retirement. Additionally, I have observed people no longer getting a degree in only one field of study. People no longer work the 9-to-5 Monday through Friday type of schedule. The job market has


Adjusting My Career to Vision Loss

Editor's note: Welcome Audrey Demmitt, new VisionAware Peer Advisor. A Career I Dreamed Of The day I graduated from the University of Arizona in 1983 with a nursing degree was a personal triumph. I looked forward to a career I dreamed of since childhood. I was certain I had found my life’s passion in nursing. My future was full of promise and excitement. Then at age 25, a vision exam turned everything upside down. The diagnosis was retinitis pigmentosa and my future became uncertain. Continued to Work After Diagnosis A long journey followed as I struggled to


Open Yourself to Life as a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Angela Winfield Editor's note: New peer advisor Angela Winfield, Esq. who lost her vision from complications with cataracts, glaucoma and uveitis, is a practicing attorney at a prestigious firm, but does much, much more. In her own words,"In my different roles as attorney, author, motivational speaker and professional coach, I help people break through barriers, overcome obstacles and resolve conflicts so they can succeed in


Thoughts on Preparing for Employment

Editors Note: Today marks the beginning of National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Peer Advisor Deanna Noriega wrote this post to bring attention to the importance of employment in her life and to demonstrate how persons who are blind or visually impaired can prepare themselves for employment. Deanna: At age 14, I was the eldest child in a family of five children. Money was tight, and we were all expected to pitch in around the house. I wanted to be able to save money for things I would need for college, buy the occasional treat like a record by my favorite musical group or new dress. I had lost my vision at


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