Visually Impaired: Now What? 2017 Archive

January 2017

Review of "How Do You Do It Blind: Answers from People with Blindness and Visual Impairment"

This review is part of our bookshelf series Author Shares His Story of Blindness In 109 pages, Steven Obremski truly accomplishes his goal—to answer the question posed in the book's title “How Do You Do It Blind” for both the general public and people who are newly visually impaired. Answers are provided by hundreds of visually impaired people Steven has worked with in the blindness field, people he interviewed for this book, and his own life experiences. In chapter one,


Keeping Your Balance Through Outdoor Bike Riding

"Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving." Albert Einstein Editor's note: In the New Year we all make promises to ourselves about coming up with a new weight loss plan or exercising more. Beckie Horter, new VisionAware peer advisor, describes her joy in bike riding and how she does it. Feeling Out of Balance To keep moving is not always an easy thing for people with vision loss to do. While we may want to stay active, and may even seek it out, our vision oftentimes interferes and spoils our best-laid plans. I discovered this firsthand after central vision loss left me legally blind in my mid-thirties. Along with


Birth Options for Mothers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Once a woman learns she’s about to have a child, her attention is immediately directed towards prenatal care. At the mid-point of pregnancy, approximately 20 weeks, doctors will begin discussing a birth plan with the expectant parents. A birth plan is a document that lets your medical team know your preferences for your delivery, including things like how to manage your labor pain. Having your wishes recorded in the form of this written document ensures your healthcare provider understands your wishes with regards to the delivery of your child. It is important to note that although preparation for birth is essential, the new mother may not be able to control every aspect of her labor and delivery. Sometimes the unexpected happens, and you must remain flexible in cases where you may be


Beginning on a Positive "Quote"

At this time of year, New Year resolutions abound. As a writer and a person living with a visual impairment, I am always on the look out for uplifting quotations that will help me focus on new ventures and goals. I find encouragement and peace of mind when I stop for a moment to consider the wise words of others and can gain insights for my personal aspirations. Like a beacon radiating with light, quotations have the ability to cast a more positive perspective on our thought process when life can get challenging. Following are 17 quotations especially chosen for their uplifting message under the three themes of acceptance, courage, and


One Dot at a Time: Learning Braille As Someone with Low Vision

I love to learn. I read books frequently. I ask people about how they do things. I visit museums. I watch TV programs and listen to podcasts reporting on news and art and history. Give me the remote, a Netflix documentary, and a bowl of white cheddar popcorn, and I’m set for the night. My curiosity about life compels me to understand. When I gained low vision a few years ago, I decided to learn how to adapt so I could still live a purposeful life. I switched from paperbacks to ebooks and audiobooks. I use audio tour headsets at museums. I


I'm Thinkin' 'Bout Good Intentions

By Lynda Lambert Do you look forward to making positive changes at the beginning of each new year? A couple of years ago, I thought I would make a new start. I wrote down my resolutions and a goal plan. But after a few months, my plans were forgotten for I seemed to be unable to sustain the level of attention required. Of course, I felt like I failed. Does this happen to you? If so, you're not alone. Statistics of New Year's Resolutions Roughly 45 percent of all Americans make New Year's


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